Tracy Hart, a water resource economist in Washington, D.C., submitted six words to The Race Card Project: Yes, I'm tobacco-pickin' white trash. In submitting her words and photo, she says she was taking ownership. "This is who I am, and if I'm going to understand anyone else, I'm going to understand myself first." Courtesy of Tracy Hart hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Tracy Hart

6 Words: Yes, I'm Tobacco-Pickin' White Trash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456350609/461247441" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jamaal Allan is a teacher in Des Moines, Iowa. His name has taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters. Courtesy of Jamaal Allan hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jamaal Allan

6 Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/404432206/404626552" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marc Quarles, his wife, Claudia Paul, and their children, Joshua and Danielle, live in an affluent, predominantly white neighborhood in California. Quarles says his neighbors treat him differently when his children aren't around. Courtesy of Marc Quarles hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Marc Quarles

Six Words: 'With Kids, I'm Dad. Alone, Thug'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/361804353/364641171" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Waverly Adcock, a sergeant and founder of the West Augusta Guard, prepares his company for inspection and battle at a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia. Sara Smith, whose great-great-grandfather was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, holds the Confederate battle flag. Courtesy of Jesse Dukes hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jesse Dukes

Six Words: 'Must We Forget Our Confederate Ancestors?'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/357576237/357737210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day. Courtesy of Carol Zachary hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/327245430/327583167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Actors John Kerr and France Nuyen in a scene from the 1958 film South Pacific. The interracial romance between the onstage pair unsettled some audiences. 20th Century Fox/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
20th Century Fox/Getty Images

Six Words: 'You've Got To Be Taught' Intolerance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/308296815/313844306" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students. Maisie Crow hide caption

toggle caption
Maisie Crow

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/304194508/304329728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lupita Nyong'o and Chiwetel Ejiofor play Patsey and Solomon, two slaves on a Louisiana plantation, in 12 Years a Slave. Francois Duhamel/Fox Searchlight Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Francois Duhamel/Fox Searchlight Pictures

'12 Years A Slave' Inspires 'True Conversations' About Slavery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/262946971/262946974" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I have this day granted bargained and sold and by these present do grant bargain and sell unto the said Edward Clegg a Certain Mulatto Girl named Harriet aged about eight years. Slave for life, and sound in body and mind, and the title to said Girl I do hereby warrant and will forever defend." Courtesy of Todd Perry hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Todd Perry

A Woman Comes To Terms With Her Family's Slave-Owning Past

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/262431646/262641088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Michael Goings, a man of colour personally appearing in Court and producing satisfactory evidence of his freedom. It is ordered that the following be entered as his Register. To wit, aged 23 years 5 feet 11 1/2 inches high of light complexion. No scars no marks perceivable all of which is ordered to be certified." Courtesy of Robert Goins hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Robert Goins

Discovering Grief And Freedom In A Family's History Of Slavery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/262165884/262357293" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil with her grandmother, who taught her to make the Filipino dish lumpia, in 2009. Courtesy of Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil

After Years Of Pasta, Rice Returns To A Filipino Family Kitchen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/247343239/247468823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alex Sugiura was featured, along with his brother and other mixed-race Americans, in the 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic Magazine in October. The brothers are of Japanese and Eastern European descent, but people often mistake Alex for Hispanic. Martin Schoeller/National Geographic hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Schoeller/National Geographic

Seeing Opportunity In A Question: 'Where Are You Really From?'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/242357164/244452971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wilma Stordahl with her sons (from left) Kevin, Kazon and Kenneth at Kazon's high school graduation. "We think of Norwegians as being tall and blond and blue-eyed," Stordahl says. "My sons are tall — but they're not blond and blue-eyed." Courtesy of Wilma Stordahl hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Wilma Stordahl

Holding Onto The Other Half Of 'Mixed-Race'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/231447526/233790757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

All Washington, D.C., liquor stores were closed on Aug. 28, 1963. While Maury Landsman's parents, who owned a liquor store, stayed home that day, he was determined to participate in the march. Charles Del Vecchio/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Del Vecchio/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Clarence B. Jones, legal adviser to Martin Luther King Jr., takes notes behind King at a press conference regarding in Birmingham, Ala., in February 1963. Ernst Haas/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ernst Haas/Getty Images

For King's Adviser, Fulfilling The Dream 'Cannot Wait'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/216141088/216356132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Clarence B. Jones this month in Palo Alto, Calif. As Martin Luther King Jr.'s attorney and adviser, Jones contributed to many of King's speeches, including his famous speech at the March on Washington in 1963. Norbert von der Groeben/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Norbert von der Groeben/Reuters/Landov

Clarence B. Jones: A Guiding Hand Behind 'I Have A Dream'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/214224111/216006593" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Joseph Burden (third row, third from right) with his graduating class at Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department training academy in 1960. Every officer on the force was required to work the day of the March on Washington. Courtesy of Joseph Burden hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Joseph Burden

Two Officers, Black And White, On Walking The '63 March Beat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/214223967/215663837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At 1963 March, A Face In The Crowd Became A Poster Child

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/213804335/214067108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Civil rights activist William Moore made several one-man marches for racial equality. In April 1963, he was killed during a march from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss. Baltimore Sun hide caption

toggle caption
Baltimore Sun

Robert Avery has been a councilman in his hometown of Gadsden, Ala., for almost three decades. As a teen, he and two friends hitchhiked to the nation's capital, where they made signs for the March on Washington. Erica Yoon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Erica Yoon/NPR

Determined To Reach 1963 March, Teen Used Thumb And Feet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/210470828/211891887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation. Courtesy of Jack Hansan hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jack Hansan

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/207913707/209097964" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Caryn Lantz and her husband Chuck were surprised to learn that costs associated with adopting black children were much lower than for white or mixed race children. They ultimately went with an adoption in which the fee was based on their income, not skin color. Courtesy of Caryn Lantz hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Caryn Lantz

Six Words: 'Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/195967886/196133928" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/190387908/190601876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Elysha O'Brien and her husband, Michael, with their sons. Elysha never learned Spanish but is determined that her children will. Courtesy of the O'Brien family hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the O'Brien family

Living In Two Worlds, But With Just One Language

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/185839159/186195952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For A Black Doctor, Building Trust By Slowing Down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/178442772/180240909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript