Wilma Stordahl with her sons (from left) Kevin, Kazon and Kenneth at Kazon's high school graduation. "We think of Norwegians as being tall and blond and blue-eyed," Stordahl says. "My sons are tall — but they're not blond and blue-eyed." Courtesy of Wilma Stordahl hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Wilma Stordahl

Holding Onto The Other Half Of 'Mixed-Race'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/231447526/233790757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

All Washington, D.C., liquor stores were closed on Aug. 28, 1963. While Maury Landsman's parents, who owned a liquor store, stayed home that day, he was determined to participate in the march. Charles Del Vecchio/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Charles Del Vecchio/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Clarence B. Jones, legal adviser to Martin Luther King Jr., takes notes behind King at a press conference regarding in Birmingham, Ala., in February 1963. Ernst Haas/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ernst Haas/Getty Images

For King's Adviser, Fulfilling The Dream 'Cannot Wait'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/216141088/216356132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Clarence B. Jones this month in Palo Alto, Calif. As Martin Luther King Jr.'s attorney and adviser, Jones contributed to many of King's speeches, including his famous speech at the March on Washington in 1963. Norbert von der Groeben/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Norbert von der Groeben/Reuters/Landov

Clarence B. Jones: A Guiding Hand Behind 'I Have A Dream'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/214224111/216006593" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Joseph Burden (third row, third from right) with his graduating class at Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department training academy in 1960. Every officer on the force was required to work the day of the March on Washington. Courtesy of Joseph Burden hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Joseph Burden

Two Officers, Black And White, On Walking The '63 March Beat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/214223967/215663837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At 1963 March, A Face In The Crowd Became A Poster Child

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/213804335/214067108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Civil rights activist William Moore made several one-man marches for racial equality. In April 1963, he was killed during a march from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss. Baltimore Sun hide caption

toggle caption Baltimore Sun

Robert Avery has been a councilman in his hometown of Gadsden, Ala., for almost three decades. As a teen, he and two friends hitchhiked to the nation's capital, where they made signs for the March on Washington. Erica Yoon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Erica Yoon/NPR

Determined To Reach 1963 March, Teen Used Thumb And Feet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/210470828/211891887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation. Courtesy of Jack Hansan hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Jack Hansan

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/207913707/209097964" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Caryn Lantz and her husband Chuck were surprised to learn that costs associated with adopting black children were much lower than for white or mixed race children. They ultimately went with an adoption in which the fee was based on their income, not skin color. Courtesy of Caryn Lantz hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Caryn Lantz

Six Words: 'Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/195967886/196133928" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/190387908/190601876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Elysha O'Brien and her husband, Michael, with their sons. Elysha never learned Spanish but is determined that her children will. Courtesy of the O'Brien family hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the O'Brien family

Living In Two Worlds, But With Just One Language

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/185839159/186195952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For A Black Doctor, Building Trust By Slowing Down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/178442772/180240909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dave Kung with wife Sarah Tyson (left), stepson Cy Tyson-Brown and parents Sonja and George Kung. Courtesy of Dave Kung hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Dave Kung

When You're Mixed Race, Just One Box Is Not Enough

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/175292625/175997102" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A submission to the Race Card Project, which asks people to describe their experience with race in six words. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

toggle caption Cliff Owen/AP

Six Words: Ask Who I Am, Not What

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/173816975/174174538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript