Chef Lao Wei Xiong cooks up a carry-out order for foreign reporters in the kitchen at al Maida restaurant in Tripoli. NPR hide caption

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Tripoli's Lone Chinese Restaurant Still Delivers

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A Young Hitchhiker's Guide To The Road: Smile

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A Saudi woman crosses in front of several automobiles in a marketplace on Sept. 16, 1990, in Dammam. Women in Saudi Arabia are not allowed to drive, have little say in matters of marriage and divorce, and cannot travel without a letter of permission from their male guardian. David Longstreath/AP hide caption

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In A Land Of Few Rights, Saudi Women Fight To Vote

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The last time NPR's Eric Westervelt saw backpacker Billy Six, he was at Benghazi's port trying to catch a boat ride to the besieged city of Misurata. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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Backpacking Through The Revolutions Of North Africa

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Libyan women hold pictures of leader Moammar Gadhafi in Tripoli earlier this month during a protest against the U.N. resolution authorizing a no-fly zone. The government, says NPR's David Greene, wants Tripoli to seem like a place full of people who revere Gadhafi. There are signs, however, that Gadhafi's grip on the capital could be loosening. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Libya, The Truth Is Often Tough To Pin Down

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In Reporting Nuclear Crisis, Fears Of Exposure

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Trevor Snapp for NPR

As Tide Turns, Rebels' Dream Of 'Free Libya' Dims

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Decades ago, the border fence near the port of entry at Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales, Mexico, was made of wire mesh. Now it's a thick steel wall covered with graffiti. Loosely translated, this part of the wall says "Walls Equal Death," although the end of the phrase is not shown. Claudio Sanchez/NPR hide caption

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Claudio Sanchez/NPR

Once A Mexican Tourist Town, Now No Man's Land

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As winter approaches, Bill Thompson gave Melissa Block's backyard in Washington, D.C., a bird feeding makeover. "It's the time of year most folks start feeding actively, cause we get a lot of the northern birds coming down for the winter, to what they feel is our milder climate," he says. Here, an Eastern bluebird sits on an icy feeder. Bill Thompson III hide caption

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Bill Thompson III

Bird Feeding Tips For The Urban Yard

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Troops crowd President Obama during his visit to Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan on Friday. Jim Watson/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama Goes A Long Way To Spread Holiday Cheer

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The deep-water-research submarine Alvin is launched from Atlantis. Scientists are studying how ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico may have been affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Deep-Water Dive Reveals Spilled Oil On Gulf Floor

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Feral, Beast Or Canine? Artist Makes Fangs To Scare

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