Millennials Force Car Execs To Rethink Business Plans
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Audi's night vision assistant, an example of how car companies are making cars that are part of drivers' digital lives. Courtesy of Audi hide caption

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To Attract Millennials, Automakers Look To Smartphones
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Zach Brown's preferred mode of transportation is his skateboard. Brown, 27, is an artist and actor who doesn't own a car. Courtesy of Zach Brown hide caption

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Why Millennials Are Ditching Cars And Redefining Ownership
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Classic cars of all makes and models drive the 16-mile stretch along Woodward Avenue during the annual Dream Cruise in 2009 in Ferndale, Mich. During the annual event, the glory days of car culture return, if only for a day. Jerry S. Mendoza/AP hide caption

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Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?
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Teenagers turn to their phones and social media to find rides. Tanggineka Hall/Youth Radio hide caption

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Teens Use Twitter To Thumb Rides
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To teens today, cars aren't important in the same way they were in American Graffiti, the 1973 film directed by George Lucas. Lucasfilm/Coppola Co/Universal hide caption

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The Changing Story Of Teens And Cars
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