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Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds
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He's not just getting a cold. He's building his microbiome. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Say hello to your microbiome, Rob Stein. Our intrepid correspondent decided to get his gut bacteria analyzed. Now he's wondering if he needs to eat more garlic and onions. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues
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Knight (left) and Bucheli take soil samples from beneath one of the decomposing bodies. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Could Detectives Use Microbes To Solve Murders?
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Billie Iverson, 86, of Cranston, R.I., recently underwent a transplant of intestinal microbes that likely saved her life. Ryan T. Conaty for NPR hide caption

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Microbe Transplants Treat Some Diseases That Drugs Can't Fix
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We may not see them, but we need them. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint
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It's busy down there: a gut bacterium splits into two, becoming two new cells. Centre For Infections/Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes
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Bad bug: The bacterium Clostridium difficile kills 14,000 people in the United States each year. Janice Carr/CDC/dapd hide caption

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Sucking may be one of the most beneficial ways to clean a baby's dirty pacifier, a study found iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Parents' Saliva On Pacifiers Could Ward Off Baby's Allergies
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Gut Bacteria's Belch May Play A Role In Heart Disease
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Finally, A Map Of All The Microbes On Your Body
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