It's busy down there: a gut bacterium splits into two, becoming two new cells. Centre For Infections/Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

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Bad bug: The bacterium Clostridium difficile kills 14,000 people in the United States each year. Janice Carr/CDC/dapd hide caption

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Sucking may be one of the most beneficial ways to clean a baby's dirty pacifier, a study found iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Parents' Saliva On Pacifiers Could Ward Off Baby's Allergies

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Gut Bacteria's Belch May Play A Role In Heart Disease

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Finally, A Map Of All The Microbes On Your Body

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