The Human Microbiome: Guts And Glory We truly are legion. Trillions of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes dwell in organized communities in and on the nooks and plains of the human body. From birth to death, they shape our health — and not always for the worse.

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Parents' Saliva On Pacifiers Could Ward Off Baby's Allergies

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Gut Bacteria's Belch May Play A Role In Heart Disease

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Finally, A Map Of All The Microbes On Your Body

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