We hate losing twice as much as we love winning, behavioral researchers say. And that gets us into trouble with financial decisions. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

More and more older adults are becoming entrepreneurs instead of retiring, like Paul Tasner of Pulpworks, who spoke at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition in California. Courtesy of Kevin Warnock hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Kevin Warnock

Isaias Hernandez (left) counsels Paul Garcia on his finances at the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation in Montebello, Calif. Courtesy of the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation

Manuel "Manny" Aguirre, 80, has been mixing cocktails at Musso and Frank Grill in Los Angeles for more than two decades. He works part time and could retire — but he doesn't want to. Courtesy of Musso and Frank Grill hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Musso and Frank Grill

Anita Wallace runs a child care service in rural Athens County, Ohio. She hadn't saved much for retirement before the Appalachian Savings Project offered to match half of her savings up to $600. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jennifer Ludden/NPR