"My brain used to be my best friend," says Greg O'Brien, a journalist with early onset Alzheimer's. But he can't trust it anymore, he says. Alzheimer's is, in some ways, changing who he is. Amanda Kowalski and Samantha Broun for NPR hide caption

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Despite losing his sense of taste and smell to Alzheimer's disease, Greg O'Brien says grilling supper on the back deck with his son on a summer evening is still fun. Sam Broun/Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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When Alzheimer's Steals Your Appetite, Remember To Laugh
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Greg O'Brien and his wife are finding it more difficult to drive to and from their family's secluded house on Cape Cod. As they move out and move on, O'Brien has discovered a bittersweet trove of memories. Sam Broun/Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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When Losing Memory Means Losing Home
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Seeing What Isn't There: Inside Alzheimer's Hallucinations
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Greg and Mary Catherine O'Brien with their kids, at daughter Colleen's marriage to Matt Everett last August. Greg has early-onset Alzheimer's. From left, Brendan O'Brien, Greg O'Brien, Colleen O'Brien, Matt Everett, Mary Catherine O'Brien, and Conor O'Brien. Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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Supporting A Spouse With Alzheimer's: 'I Don't Get Angry Anymore'
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Greg O'Brien gathers his thoughts before a run in 2013. "Running is essential," he says. Michael Strong/Living With Alzheimers hide caption

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One Man's Race To Outrun Alzheimer's
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Greg O'Brien (left), with Colleen, Mary Catherine, Conor, and Brendan O'Brien, has been grappling with Alzheimer's disease for the last five years. Courtesy Greg O'Brien hide caption

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After Alzheimer's Diagnosis, 'The Stripping Away Of My Identity'
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When he was 59 years old, Greg O'Brien was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Five years later, he is speaking publicly about his experience, even as his symptoms worsen. Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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'How Do You Tell Your Kids That You've Got Alzheimer's?'
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