Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images

Hidden Brain: Terror Strikes And An Attacker's Identity

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images

In the aftermath of a police-involved shooting, there's often a familiar debate about what led to it. But research shows there's an underlying cause that we often miss. JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images

Police Shootings: How A Culture Of Racism Can Infect Us All

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Psychologist Phil Tetlock thinks the parable of the fox and the hedgehog represents two different cognitive styles. "The hedgehogs are more the big idea people, more decisive," while the foxes are more accepting of nuance, more open to using different approaches with different problems. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR

The Triumphs And Perils Of 'Going Big'

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Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images

Researchers Ferret Out Information From White House Visitor Logs

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In the aftermath of a police-involved shooting, there's often a familiar debate about what led to it. But research shows there's an underlying cause that we often miss. JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images

Is recycling bad? No, but research suggests recycling can have a downside. Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images hide caption

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Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images

Why Recycling Options Lead People To Waste More

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The "broken windows" theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Image Source/Getty Images

Modern psychology shows that we all have a little bit of Narcissus in us. Most of us like people who remind us of ourselves — whether that is someone else with the same name or the same birthday. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr
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Advice For Your Dinner Party Stories: Keep It Familiar

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Psychologist Phil Tetlock thinks the parable of the fox and the hedgehog represents two different cognitive styles. "The hedgehogs are more the big idea people, more decisive," while the foxes are more accepting of nuance, more open to using different approaches with different problems. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

A person illegally pans for gold at a site in the Department of Choco near the city of Quibdo, Colombia, on Friday, Nov. 11, 2016. According to Santiago Angel, head of the Colombian mining association, about 85 percent of the 59 tons of gold produced last year in Colombia comes from operations without government licenses or environmental permits. Nicolo Filippo Ross/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolo Filippo Ross/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Illegal Gold Mining Relates To The Spread Of Malaria

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Dan Sipple/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Why Social Media Isn't Always Very Social

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Taken in aggregate, the billions of online searches we make every day say a lot about our most private thoughts and biases. Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images
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Instead Of Showing Off Wealth, Some Show Off Busy Schedules

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Protesters attend the Women's March on Washington a day after U.S. President Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th U.S. president. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Researchers Examine The Psychology Of Protest Movements

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