Nothing, Not Even Recovery, Moves Quickly In New Orleans
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10 Years After Hurricane Katrina, Randy Adams Still Counts His Blessings
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Ronnie Landry, 14, plays basketball in front of his home on Schnell Drive. He and his father, Wilbert Landry, bottom right, moved here from the 9th Ward of New Orleans in 2014. Noney Deffes, bottom left, is a longtime Schnell Drive resident who survived the flood in a neighbor's attic, then lived out of her recreational vehicle before returning to her home. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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The Survivors' Street: 10 Years Of Life After Katrina
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Decade After Hurricane Katrina, Obama Celebrates New Orleans' Resilience
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President George W. Bush (center) surveys the devastation in New Orleans with (from left to right) Vice Adm. Thad Allen, Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco, Mayor Ray Nagin and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Sept. 12, 2005, two weeks after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job ..."
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Bordelons: The Deaths Since Katrina Were Worse Than The Hurricane
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Joel Munguia (center), owner of Chino's, a barbershop in Kenner, La., sits with his nephew, Waldyn Munguia (left), as they have a laugh outside on the waiting benches at the shop. Munguia came to New Orleans from Honduras in 2005 after Katrina and opened his dream shop for Latino hairstyles in 2012. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Some Moved On, Some Moved In And Made A New New Orleans
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Lower Ninth Ward Residents Remember When The Levees Failed New Orleans
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Johnny Jackson looks out the back door of his home as he talks to his neighbors in New Orleans. Jackson's home is still under construction 10 years after Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed his property. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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At A Shelter Of Last Resort, Decency Prevailed Over Depravity
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University Medical Center New Orleans on Aug. 1, when the $1 billion facility welcomed its first patients. Brett Duke/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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Katrina Shut Down Charity Hospital But Led To More Primary Care
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Kenneth Jackson stands outside the Dew Drop Inn, which his grandfather, Frank Painia, opened in 1938. John Burnett for NPR hide caption

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As New Orleans Recovers, Will The Dew Drop Inn Swing Again?
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Angela Chalk looks at a home in New Orleans' 7th Ward that hasn't been touched since Hurricane Katrina. Chalk, the vice president of the 7th Ward neighborhood association, spends some of her free time tracking down and reporting dilapidated and abandoned properties. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins
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Mississippi resident Ethel Curry stands in front of her East Biloxi home, which was rebuilt with the help of volunteers after Hurricane Katrina. Evelina Burnett/MPB hide caption

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Scars Of Katrina Slow To Heal For Mississippi Gulf Coast
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New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu speaks about New Orleans' emergence as a model of urban renewal and economic recovery 10 years after Hurricane Katrina during a visit Tuesday to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mayor Landrieu To Displaced New Orleanians: 'Y'all Can Come Home'
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In New Orleans' Hardest-Hit Neighborhood, A Recovery — By Sheer Will
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A view of Pearlington, Miss., 10 years after Hurricane Katrina. The East Pearl River and St. Tammany Parish in Louisiana are to the left. David Grunfeld/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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In Town Hard-Hit By Katrina, Buyouts Offer Opportunity — For Lucky Few
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10 Years After Katrina, New Orleans' Brass Bands March On
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On Aug. 30, 2005, a man walks past a shrimp boat that was blown up on the dock in Bayou la Batre, Ala., after Hurricane Katrina came through the area. Rob Carr/AP hide caption

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Double Disasters Leave An Alabama Fishing Village Struggling
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'Shots On The Bridge' Unpacks A Tangled Story Of Deceit And Tragedy
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