A visitor takes photos with her smartphone outside the Supreme Court in 2014, while the judges heard arguments related to warrantless cellphone searches by police. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Worcester Polytechnic Institute professor Susan Landau is sworn in alongside Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell (left) and New York County District Attorney Cyrus Vance at a congressional hearing on encryption on March 1. Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Digital Security Is An 'Arms Race' Between Firms And The Feds

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Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell (left) listens to FBI Director James Comey testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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New York police officers stand outside an Apple Store on Tuesday while monitoring a pro-encryption demonstration. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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In Fighting FBI, Apple Says Free Speech Rights Mean No Forced Coding

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Lawyer Ted Olson, shown at the Los Angeles premiere of HBO's The Case Against 8 in 2014, is representing Apple in its legal faceoff with federal investigators. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Lawyer For Apple: 'What In The Law Requires Us To Redesign The iPhone?'

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Privacy is one of a number of issues Apple CEO Tim Cook has called morally important. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Apple's CEO Takes A Stand — And A Risk

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San Bernardino Chief of Police Jarrod Burguan says the search of the iPhone used by one of the shooters is "an effort to leave no stone unturned" in the investigation of the Dec. 2 terrorist attack. Robert Gauthier/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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San Bernardino Police Chief Sees Chance Nothing Of Value On Shooter's iPhone

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What It Means For Apple To Get Around iPhone's Encryption

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An iPhone user attends a rally at the Apple flagship store in Manhattan on Tuesday to support the company's refusal to help the FBI access an encrypted iPhone. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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The official seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is seen on an iPhone's camera screen outside the J. Edgar Hoover headquarters in Washington, D.C. Apple is facing off with the FBI in court over investigators' request that the tech giant help them circumvent the iPhone's security features. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper, seated at the table meets with the Senate Intelligence Committee Feb. 9, including Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C. Burr and the committee's minority leader, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are working on a bill that would force companies like Apple to help prosecutors unlock the phones of criminal suspects. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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In Apple-FBI Fight, Congress Considers Aggressive And Measured Approaches

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Apple CEO Tim Cook says creating new software to break into a locked iPhone would be "bad news" and "we would never write it." He spoke with ABC News' World News Tonight with David Muir. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: Backdoor To iPhones Would Be Software Equivalent Of Cancer

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U.S. Lawmakers Propose National Commission To Address Apple Standoff

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CIA Director John Brennan discussed ISIS, the FBI-Apple dispute over an iPhone, the state of the Iran nuclear deal, and his future plans as President Obama's term draws to a close. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Listen To Part 1 On 'Morning Edition'

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A customer tries out the Apple iPhone 6S on Sept. 25, 2015, in Chicago. As a legal dispute simmers, Apple CEO Tim Cook and FBI Director James Comey issue separate calls for more conversations about privacy and security in the smartphone era. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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In Apple Dispute, FBI Director Urges A 'Deep Breath' Over Phone Security

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The Seeds Of Apple's Standoff With DOJ May Have Been Sown In Brooklyn

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