Yahoo Chief Information Security Officer Bob Lord on encryption: "Yes, it's used by terrorists. It's also used by people who are looking to voice their opinions on issues and to save lives." Yahoo hide caption

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The U.S. Justice Department has again found a way to access a locked iPhone without Apple's help, so investigators can access data involved in a court case. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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The official FBI seal is seen on an iPhone camera screen outside the agency's headquarters. With help from a third party, the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by one of San Bernardino shooters. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The Next Apple-FBI Question: Who Can Know How The iPhone Was Hacked?
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Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., have introduced encryption legislation. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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The Next Encryption Battleground: Congress
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The anonymous Web surfing system Tor is run by volunteers — and sometimes they get caught between the police and criminal suspects. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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When A Dark Web Volunteer Gets Raided By The Police
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After Apple Case, Encryption Vs. National Security Dilemma Has Just Begun
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Prosecutor Cody Hiland speaks at a news conference in Conway, Ark., on Aug. 7, after two teenagers were charged in the murders of Robert and Patricia Cogdell. On Wednesday, the FBI agreed to help the Faulkner County prosecutor get access to an iPhone and iPod that belonged to the suspects. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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A protester supporting Apple in its battle against the FBI holds up an iPhone that reads "No Entry" outside an Apple store in New York on Feb. 23. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Apple Vs. The FBI: The Unanswered Questions And Unsettled Issues
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Should Apple Unlock Terrorist's Phone? Listeners' Questions Answered
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A customer tries out a new iPhone at an Apple store in Chicago. The FBI is working with a "third party" to test a method of seeing what's inside the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters without Apple's help. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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A pedestrian walks by an Apple store in New York City on Feb. 23. Protesters demonstrated against the FBI's efforts to require the company to make it easier to unlock the encrypted iPhone used by Syed Rizwan Farook. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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From Reagan's Cyber Plan To Apple Vs. FBI: 'Everything Is Up For Grabs'
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Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the latest version of the iPhone on Monday in Cupertino, Calif. The company's legal fight with the FBI may be at an end, or at least a detente, if a third party's suggestion lets the agency hack into the San Bernardino shooters' encrypted iPhone. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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The 227-year-old law at the center of the Apple-FBI debate has withstood several challenges, including at the Supreme Court. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Gambling Case Does, And Doesn't, Apply To The iPhone Debate
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Encryption, Privacy Are Larger Issues Than Fighting Terrorism, Clarke Says
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