Boundbreakers: People Who Make A Difference NPR explores the stories of individuals who have made a difference well before the rest of the world recognized it.

Participants in Project GRIP celebrate one man's release. Through the yearlong course, prisoners are taught how to confront and deal with what got them into prison in the first place. Courtesy of Jacques Verduin hide caption

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Courtesy of Jacques Verduin

Psychologist Helps San Quentin Prisoners Find Freedom Through Self-Reflection

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Crisis Mapping Pioneer Focuses On Humanitarian Uses For Drones

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Dr. Harry Selker, a cardiologist, works on collaborations to improve delivery of medical care. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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M. Scott Brauer for NPR

This Doctor Is Trying To Stop Heart Attacks In Their Tracks

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Frances Moore Lappe speaks at a Rainforest Action Network event. When she wrote the best-selling Diet For A Small Planet back in 1971, she helped start a conversation about the social and environmental impacts of the foods we choose. Rainforest Action Network/Flickr hide caption

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Rainforest Action Network/Flickr

If You Think Eating Is A Political Act, Say Thanks To Frances Moore Lappe

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Susan Glisson, former director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi, facilitates discussions on slavery and race. Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity hide caption

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Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity

'Only Cheap Talk Is Cheap': Mississippi Woman Hosts Conversations About Race

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Peggy O'Neill stands outside Edmunds Elementary and Middle Schools in Burlington, Vt. She was one of the strongest advocates for the bike lane in her city but met a lot of resistance. Laurel Wamsley/NPR hide caption

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Laurel Wamsley/NPR

With Citizens' Help, Cities Can Build A Better Bike Lane — And More

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Jacqueline de Chollet of Switzerland, now 78, helped found the Veerni Institute, which gives child brides and other girls in northern India a chance to continue their education. Yana Paskova for NPR hide caption

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Yana Paskova for NPR

A Chance Encounter On A Vacation Changed Her Life — And The Lives Of Child Brides

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Pura Belpré became the first Puerto Rican librarian at the New York Public Library in 1921. She's shown above leading a story hour in the 1930s. New York Public Library hide caption

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New York Public Library

How NYC's First Puerto Rican Librarian Brought Spanish To The Shelves

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