Pig farm workers push live pigs into a large grave in Nipah in 1999. To stop the outbreak, the Malaysian government culled almost 1 million pigs, nearly destroying the country's pork industry. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

A Taste For Pork Helped A Deadly Virus Jump To Humans

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Each year thousands of people from around the world tour the Gomantong Cave in Borneo. Although scientists have found a potentially dangerous virus in bats that roost in the cave, no one has ever gotten sick from a trip here. Razis Nasri hide caption

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Razis Nasri

The Next Pandemic Could Be Dripping On Your Head

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Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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