Turning The Tables Turning The Tables

The real TLC (from left to right, Tionne 'T-Boz' Watkins, Lisa 'Left Eye' Lopes and Rozonda 'Chilli' Thomas) in the early '90s. Tim Roney/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Roney/Getty Images

Turning The Tables: Women Of The '90s

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552329670/552373621" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Cher (pictured here performing in 2017) has had a career of boundless musical versatility. Her 1971 album, Gypsys, Tramps & Thieves was the first of her many comeback iterations. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Ranging from mystic drone to explosive free jazz, Roberts digs into the dirt along the spiritual roots of American blues, jazz, rock and more on Coin Coin Chapter Three: Run River Thee. Matthew Eisman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Eisman/Getty Images

Whitney Houston (shown here performing in 1994) starred in the movie Waiting To Exhale, and contributed several songs to its breathtaking, beloved soundtrack. Patrick Hertzog/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Hertzog/AFP/Getty Images

Lux Interior and Poison Ivy, founding members of The Cramps, whose music reignited the sound of 1950s and early 1960s rock 'n' roll. Steve Jennings/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Jennings/Courtesy of the artist

Nancy & Lee is a linchpin of horn-driven, off-kilter, sing-speak '60s pop, and Nancy Sinatra's crystalline pipes make it glisten. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Central Press/Getty Images

Clockwise from upper left: Lauryn Hill, Joni Mitchell (Blue album cover), PJ Harvey (Rid of Me album cover), Nina Simone, Ofra Haza (Fifty Gates of Wisdom album cover), Aretha Franklin. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artists

New Mix: Turning The Tables Takes Over All Songs Considered

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542067973/542332826" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mary Lou Williams' choral masterpiece Black Christ Of The Andes showcased her seemingly endless ability to innovate. William P. Gotlieb/Library of Congress via flickr.com hide caption

toggle caption
William P. Gotlieb/Library of Congress via flickr.com

Janis Joplin in 1969. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Evening Standard/Getty Images

Turning The Tables with Ann Powers On World Cafe

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/539063805/539066995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">