Democracy demonstrators wave the Burmese flag in August 1988, when millions of Burmese took to the streets. Students led the protests, but were soon joined by civil servants, police, soldiers and ordinary citizens. Courtesy of Gaye Paterson hide caption

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Courtesy of Gaye Paterson

As Myanmar Opens Up, A Look Back On A 1988 Uprising

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Melissa Rodriguez struggled to create a stable life at home for her son in the late 1990s. Today, he's a teenager and together, they've faced many challenges. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Teenage Diaries Revisited: Mother And Son Listen To The Past

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In 1996, Josh Cutler took his tape recorder to high school, documenting his effort to live a normal life. Today, he also documents his efforts to live a normal life with a brain that often betrays him. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Teenage Diaries Revisited: Growing Up With Tourette's

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Frankie Lewchuk had been a high school football star whose picture was in his hometown newspaper every week. Now, after struggling with a crystal meth addiction, he is trying to repair his life. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Teenage Diaries Revisited: From Kicking A Football To Kicking Meth

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Joe Richman, founder and executive producer of Radio Diaries, tracked down some of the teen diarists from the 1990s and got updates on their lives. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Juan recorded his first diary at 18. He now lives in Colorado and is married with three children. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Teenage Diaries Revisited: Living Life Under The Radar

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Amanda as a teenager (left). She now lives in Manhattan and works as a massage therapist. Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Teenage Diaries Revisited: A Gay Teen's Family, 'Evolved'

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Are you the next Radio Diaries teen diarist? M Mujdat Uzel/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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M Mujdat Uzel/iStockphoto.com

Hey Teenagers! We Want To Hear Your Stories

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During his inaugural address on Jan. 14, 1963, newly elected Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace vowed "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever." Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Bettmann/Corbis

'Segregation Forever': A Fiery Pledge Forgiven, But Not Forgotten

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Selsey was Miss Subways January-March 1964 Courtesy of Fiona Gardner hide caption

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Courtesy of Fiona Gardner

'Miss Subways': A Trip Back In Time To New York's Melting Pot

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White Citizens' Council leader Asa Earl Carter denounces school integration in Clinton, Tenn., on Aug. 31, 1956. AP hide caption

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AP

The Artful Reinvention Of Klansman Asa Earl Carter

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"Before boxing, I wanted to have 10 kids by the time I was 25. Now, my goal is to get this gold medal, go pro and be a world champion," says aspiring Olympic boxer Claressa Shields, 16. Sue Jaye Johnson hide caption

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Sue Jaye Johnson

Straight Out Of Flint: Girl Boxer Aims For Olympics

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Spanish musician and composer Pablo Casals, playing the cello in 1936. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Fox Photos/Getty Images

Robert Johnson And Pablo Casals' Game-Changers Turn 75

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On July 28, officials sent in the Washington police to evict the marchers. The action was peaceful until someone threw a brick, the police reacted with force, and two bonus marchers were shot. The situation quickly spiraled out of control. The National Archives hide caption

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The National Archives

The Bonus Army: How A Protest Led To The GI Bill

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