Afro-Venezuelan singer Betsayda Machado, performing at globalFEST in New York City in January. Kevin Yatarola/Courtesy of globalFEST hide caption

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In Joyful Harmonies, A Band From Venezuela Taps Into Their African Roots

The clarion-voiced Afro-Venezuelan singer Betsayda Machado and her band are just beginning to tour internationally. Hear them in their New York City debut at globalFEST in January.

Betsayda Machado y Parranda El Clavo, Live In Concert

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Clockwise from upper left: Ssing Ssing, Jojo Abot, Betsayda Y La Parranda El Cavo, Batida, Septeto Sentiguero Kevin Yatarola/for NPR Music hide caption

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All Songs Considered

Our Top Discoveries From globalFEST 2017

Every January, we hear some of the world's tastiest acts at a one-night showcase in Manhattan. From Korean folk songs spun into glam-rock glitter to blazing Cuban brass, this year was no exception.

Sudanese-American singer Alsarah brought her band, The Nubatones, to globalFEST this past Sunday in New York City. Kevin Yatarola/globalFEST hide caption

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Latitudes

Amid Political Change, A World Music Festival Reaffirms Its Mission

A one-night festival in New York called globalFEST is a passport to explore compelling artists from five continents. But this year's event came at a moment particularly fraught by politics.

Amid Political Change, A World Music Festival Reaffirms Its Mission

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Devo meets Davy Crockett: a member of the furry-hatted Ukrainian "folk-punk" band DakhaBrakha onstage Sunday during globalFEST at New York's Webster Hall. Ebru Yildiz for NPR hide caption

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Music Articles

What Makes globalFEST So Interesting?

Even when your smartphone can bring you music instantly from any country, it's great to spend a night sampling international acts live from Europe, Africa, Asia and beyond. Now in its second decade, the New York festival attracted a dizzying variety of music, personalities and wacky hats. Hear some of the most buzzed-about artists from this year's edition.

What Makes globalFEST So Interesting?

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All Songs Considered

Discoveries From globalFEST 2014

On this week's All Songs Considered we hear what happens when punk-pop collides with Ukrainian folk, with highlights from the 2014 globalFEST.

Discoveries From globalFEST 2014

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The Wu Force, captured in an illustration by Michael Arthur. Michael Arthur/NPR hide caption

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All Songs Considered

A World Of Live Music, Captured With Pen And Paper

While photographers click and shoot their way through live concerts, capturing the best moments in fractions of seconds, illustrator Michael Arthur prefers to preserve the highlights at what some might consider glacial speed.

Lebanese singer Yasmine Hamdan brought her cool, underground electro-pop to globalFEST at Webster Hall in New York City on Jan. 12, 2014. Ebru Yildiz for NPR hide caption

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Front Row

Yasmine Hamdan: globalFEST 2014

A solo artist based in Europe after a childhood split between Lebanon, Kuwait, Abu Dhabi and Greece, Hamdan blends new material with reworked traditional songs in a smoky-cool electro-pop setting.

Banjo master Abigail Washburn, part of an Appalachian-Chinese mash-up called The Wu Force, performs at New York City's Webster Hall as a part of globalFEST on Jan. 12, 2014. Ebru Yildiz for NPR hide caption

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The Wu-Force 2014

Hear a brand-new band featuring clawhammer banjo player Abigail Washburn. The Wu-Force merges Appalachian folk and a punk sensibility with traditional Chinese music.

The Wu-Force: globalFEST 2014

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Mexican vocalist Salvador Duran's rich baritone was at the front and center of Sergio Mendoza y la Orkesta at New York City's Webster Hall during globalFEST on January 12, 2014. Ebru Yildiz for NPR hide caption

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Sergio Mendoza y La Orkesta 2014

Hear a band from Arizona splice together mambo — by way of Mexico — with psychedelic cumbia and other Latin styles. The result sounds like Perez Prado reconfigured for the 21st century.

Sergio Mendoza y La Orkesta: globalFEST 2014

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Mauritanian artist Noura Mint Seymali performs at New York City's Webster Hall during globalFEST on Jan. 12, 2014. Ebru Yildiz for NPR hide caption

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Noura Mint Seymali 2014

With her smoky-rich voice, this Mauritanian griot artist tips toward reggae, flamenco and rock along with traditional Sahelian tonalities and rhythms in a band that includes her husband.

Noura Mint Seymali: globalFEST 2014

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