Tiny Desk Intimate concerts, recorded live at the desk of All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen.
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Gogol Bordello

Gogol Bordello's frenetic live show is a gypsy punk circus, complete with a high-wire act. So when the band arrived at the modest NPR Music offices, we wanted to make sure we were covered technically. If you watch this video and don't get to the part where Eugene Hutz dances on the desks, then you've missed the most rollicking and insane Tiny Desk Concert of all time.

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'Weird Al' Yankovic

Even after 12 million albums sold in more than three decades, Yankovic and his band still hadn't played their first Tiny Desk Concert until just now. In these three Yankovic originals (1988's "Good Old Days," 1992's "You Don't Love Me Anymore" and the new White Stripes pastiche "CNR"), it's remarkable how quickly the singer and his band adjust and thrive.

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The Mynabirds

Laura Burhenn says she'd long imagined a band that sounded like Neil Young playing Motown. A veteran of the pop group Georgie James, she formed The Mynabirds to capture a grittier and more soulful sound. Burhenn recently brought The Mynabirds to the NPR Music offices to perform songs from What We Lose in the Fire We Gain in the Flood.

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Zuill Bailey

For cellist Zuill Bailey, J.S. Bach's solo cello suites loom as a kind of musical Mount Everest. As Bailey describes it, every trip up the mountain brings a new challenge. Hear the acclaimed musician play Bach on his amazingly resonant cello, built in 1693.

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Bettye LaVette

We were not prepared for Bettye LaVette's appearance in the NPR Music offices. We thought we were — having set up our cameras and recording gear and signed in all the friends who had heard she was scheduled to play and beaten down our door. But then she blew into the room and conquered it before she'd sung a single note.

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Phoenix

The band's instantly recognizable hits such as "1901" and "Lisztomania" were stripped down and reassembled as sweetly shambling acoustic numbers.

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Tarrus Riley

In the calm-before-the-storm part of the day and week — 10 o'clock on a Monday morning, to be exact — reggae singer Tarrus Riley, saxophonist Dean Fraser and guitarist Lamont Savory showed up and performed three gorgeous, harmony-drenched reggae songs.

Moby performs at NPR. David Gilkey and John Poole/NPR hide caption

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Moby And Kelli Scarr

On an early winter's evening, with an acoustic guitar and lyric sheet in hand, Moby and Kelli Scarr strolled up to Bob Boilen's desk and gave a small concert. The casual affair was the duo's first-ever live performance of their brand-new Project Song creation, "Gone to Sleep."

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Fredrik

Fredrik's new record, Trilogi, is a strange, dark concept album meticulously crafted in a studio, so there was no telling how the band might pull off its songs in a Tiny Desk Concert. With a single strummed guitar, a snare drum, a maraca and triggered odd sounds, it all came together beautifully.