Tiny Desk Intimate concerts, recorded live at the desk of All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen.

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The Internet

The L.A. band might just be the oddest thing to come from the hip-hop collective Odd Future, mostly because its members opt to make beautiful, textured, enveloping R&B.

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Joan Shelley

As technology rules the sound of the day, it's good to be reminded how powerfully a single voice can transmit deep emotion.

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Gina Chavez

The Austin singer-songwriter performs with intense openness, directness and warmth. Watch Chavez perform three songs live in the NPR Music offices.

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Watkins Family Hour

With help from Fiona Apple, two Nickel Creek alums gather a band to perform old and new material. Watch the Watkins Family Hour perform three charming, country-flavored songs at the NPR Music offices.

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Sam Lee

This former burlesque performer found his voice by finding and preserving old British, Irish and Scottish folk songs.

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Leon Bridges

There's purity in the 26-year-old singer's soulful voice that's unadorned, untouched and unaffected by 21st-century pop. He's easy to love and tough to resist.

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Happyness

If you're a fan of dark, incredibly dry, wry humor, you've just found Happyness. Watch the London trio perform three songs that enchant and lull, even as they jar you with their quirkiness.

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Mitski

Mitski's music is dark and even scary, but glimmers of beauty peek through. Watch the singer perform three of her songs in the NPR Music offices.

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Eskimeaux

There's lighthearted, almost childlike beauty in the way Gabrielle Smith puts words to song. Here, she performs a few of Bob Boilen's favorite songs of 2015.

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Caroline Rose

Inspired by rockabilly, fast country and frequent travel, the singer plays music as if she's just met her new best friend: It's fresh, fun and performed with contagious enthusiasm.

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Son Lux

The trio blows up its sound for the Tiny Desk by adding off-duty, civilian horn players from the United States Marine Band.

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Kacey Musgraves

Before closing with the go-your-own-way anthem "Follow Your Arrow," the country singer showcases four songs from her terrific second album, Pageant Material.

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Restorations

The Philly rock band's big-hearted and decibel-shattering songs are stripped down to a few guitars and a MiniKorg in a set that will leave a lump in your throat.

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Torres

Mackenzie Scott's quiet early music gave hints that she could get loud. But it's still hard to fully prepare for the ferocity of her new work, which channels PJ Harvey and Patti Smith.

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Terence Blanchard Feat. The E-Collective

The New Orleans trumpeter wasn't thinking about Eric Garner, Michael Brown or #blacklivesmatter when he first assembled this funky new band. But then it became a way to ward off despair.