Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders was tweeting up a storm during Wednesday night's Republican debate. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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People can now contribute to presidential campaigns with just a few taps on a smartphone. Jonathan Alcorn/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Not pictured: the warped Tupperware lids Hunter Scott's bot dutifully won in a mock-sweepstakes. They were never mailed to him. Hunter Scott hide caption

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Comedian Ari Shaffir performs at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in June in Manchester, Tenn. Shaffir has said fellow comedian Carlos Mencia stole his joke about who would build a fence on the U.S.-Mexican border. Copyright on jokes is difficult to prove, and it turned out two other comedians had made similar jokes as well. John Davisson/Invision/AP hide caption

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Author Joyce Carol Oates, seen here at a a panel discussion last October, sparked jokes, and then a debate, by tweeting about the "barbaric" killing of a triceratops. Thos Robinson/Getty Images for The New Yorker hide caption

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President Barack Obama might have just gotten his own Twitter account, but he's been tweeting for years, such as during this "Twitter Town Hall" in 2011. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way

President Gets His Own Twitter Account: 'It's Barack. Really'

Obama's bio on @POTUS says he is "Dad, husband and 44th President of the United States."

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Twitter changed its direct messaging guidelines Monday. Now, any user can direct-message any other user even if they are not following each other. The new feature is not automatically enabled; users will have to opt in. iStockphoto hide caption

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Purdue University students are testing new software that may track and warn about tornadoes, such as this one which struck Rochelle, Ill., in early April. Walker Ashley/AP hide caption

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