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Peter Cvjetanovic (right) chants while holding torches at a march organized by neo-Nazi, white supremacist and white nationalist organizations in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday night. Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Worshipers at the Walloon Reformed Church of St. Augustine in Magdeburg, Germany, participate in a service where the congregation is encouraged to tweet about the liturgy and share their prayers online. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR

In Germany, Churchgoers Are Encouraged To Tweet From The Pews

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A Reddit post of a man in a business suit with the CNN logo for a head getting demolished by Trump in a wrestling match, was shared by the president himself on Twitter Sunday morning. HanAssholeSolo/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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HanAssholeSolo/Screenshot by NPR

MSNBC Morning Joe hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski arrive at the 2015 White House Correspondents' Association annual dinner. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Rep. Mike Quigley has introduced the Covfefe Act, which would expand the Presidential Records Act to include social media. Above, the Illinois Democrat on Capitol Hill on Monday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Jill Wiseman answers questions for the Contact Center based at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service hide caption

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Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service

President Trump weighed back in on Twitter, apparently trying to switch subjects, from the troubles of his former national security adviser to raising the possibility of a government shutdown. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

"DoggoLingo" is a language trend that's been gaining steam on the Internet in the past few years. Words like doggo, pupper and blep most often accompany a picture or video of a dog and have spread on social media. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

This March 28, 2017, photo shows Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., leaving a closed-door strategy session on Capitol Hill. A top aide to President Donald Trump urged the primary defeat of Amash in a tweet. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

What Is The Hatch Act? And What Does It Mean For Government Employees And Twitter?

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A now-deleted tweet from @ALT_USCIS was included in a complaint Twitter filed against the Department of Homeland Security. Twitter says DHS tried to unmask the user behind this account, which has "expressed dissent in a range of different ways," including this early tweet that "the author apparently believed cast doubt on the Administration's immigration policy." Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California hide caption

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Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California

It is time for us to assess the pros and cons of the tweetstorm, the thread, the whatever and figure out just what it all means. diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto