An anti-government protester wearing a gas mask uses a cellphone to read the news on social media as demonstrators gather at midnight in Istanbul's Taksim Gezi Park on June 13. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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More courts are asking jurors to avoid social media services and tools that have become an integral part of modern life, like Twitter, Facebook, email, texting, instant messaging and Internet research. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Monsignor Daniel Gallagher, a Latin expert at the Vatican, says people from all walks of life are following the pope's Twitter feed in Latin. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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In January, this Saudi man in Riyadh had Twitter open on his computer. Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images

After high-profile accounts have been attacked — including AP's, NPR's and the BBC's — Twitter considers how to thwart hackers and protect users. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner announces his resignation from Congress on June 16, 2011, in New York. The disgraced former congressman is reportedly considering a run for New York mayor. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Richard Drew/AP