President Trump weighed back in on Twitter, apparently trying to switch subjects, from the troubles of his former national security adviser to raising the possibility of a government shutdown. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

"DoggoLingo" is a language trend that's been gaining steam on the Internet in the past few years. Words like doggo, pupper and blep most often accompany a picture or video of a dog and have spread on social media. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

This March 28, 2017, photo shows Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., leaving a closed-door strategy session on Capitol Hill. A top aide to President Donald Trump urged the primary defeat of Amash in a tweet. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

What Is The Hatch Act? And What Does It Mean For Government Employees And Twitter?

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A now-deleted tweet from @ALT_USCIS was included in a complaint Twitter filed against the Department of Homeland Security. Twitter says DHS tried to unmask the user behind this account, which has "expressed dissent in a range of different ways," including this early tweet that "the author apparently believed cast doubt on the Administration's immigration policy." Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California hide caption

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Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California

It is time for us to assess the pros and cons of the tweetstorm, the thread, the whatever and figure out just what it all means. diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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diego_cervo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

A woman holds up her cellphone before a rally with then presidential candidate Donald Trump in Bedford, N.H., in September. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Is Donald Trump Helping Or Hurting Twitter?

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President Trump gives a thumbs up as he speaks on the phone in the Oval Office on Jan. 29. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Is Trump Tweeting From a 'Secure' Smartphone? The White House Won't Say

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Merriam-Webster's Twitter account weighs in on trending words and phrases and has waded into linguistic matters in politics, including a big campaign question: Did Donald Trump say "bigly" or "big league"? Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

President Trump called for a major investigation into voter fraud on Wednesday. This comes after widespread criticism of his unverified claim that up to 5 million people voted illegally. Ringo Chiu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ringo Chiu/AFP/Getty Images

Despite Criticism Of Claims, Trump Seeks Investigation Into Voter Fraud

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