Large portions of the Internet have declared 2016 one of the worst years ever. But 2017 hasn't gotten here yet, so let's all just simmer down. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images

In a speech on Capitol Hill honoring outgoing Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Thursday, Hillary Clinton warned of the dangers of fake news. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A tourist photographs a historic landmark plaque, on March 13, 2010, in front of the Grassy Knoll and beside the former Texas School Book Depository Building in Dealey Plaza where the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy took place in Dallas, Texas. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Freedom House reviews restrictions to Internet access and how it's used around the world, weighing whether countries are free, partly free or not free in terms of Internet freedom. Freedom House hide caption

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Freedom House

On the trail prior to the election, President-elect Donald J. Trump delivered a speech at The Union League of Philadelphia in September. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

Journalists Underestimated Trump. But We All Live In Bubbles

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People listen to the radio as the results of the presidential elections are announced in Kireka, Uganda, in February. Many rural Ugandans don't have Internet access, and the radio is a central source of news — and platform for citizens' opinions. Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Kasamani/AFP/Getty Images

Andrew Loy begs along a sidewalk in San Francisco, Calif. on June 28, 2016. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Harnessing Social Media To Reconnect Homeless People With Their Families

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