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After protests on Mizzou's campus became national news, the community is trying to figure out how to move forward. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

"You just want to be heard." — Aliyah Sulaiman

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A man plays piano near the Bataclan theater in Paris on Saturday, the day after a series of attacks on the city resulted in the deaths of at least 120 individuals. At least 80 people died inside the Bataclan. Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images

Tang Xiong Xiong, a Bichon Frise, came into the salon as a ball of fluff and emerged with her head shaped like a square. "She's getting used to it," says her owner. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

For Taiwanese Dogs, Being Square Is Stylish

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With permission, the Cruz campaign's app searches for potential supporters within users' phones Scott Detrow/NPR hide caption

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Scott Detrow/NPR

Cruz's Crew: You Play The Game, But It's The Cruz Campaign That Scores

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Could Your Social Media Footprint Step On Your Credit History?

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When Social Media Fuels Gang Violence

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Teenage girls gather in August outside an ice cream shop in Portland, Ore. A new Pew Research Center study finds that while teens use social media and other digital tools in all aspects of their romantic relationships, most still initially meet — and break up with — their love interests face-to-face. Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian/Landov hide caption

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Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian/Landov

We Need 2 Talk: Most Teens Still Start, End Their Relationships Offline

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This thumbs up or "like" icon at the Facebook main campus in Menlo Park, Calif., may soon have a neighbor. Founder Mark Zuckerberg said Tuesday that the social network soon would test a long-requested "dislike" type of button. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Ousted Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott's fondness for eating raw onions has inspired a social media campaign: #Putoutyouronions. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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