High school students whose friends posted photos of drinking and smoking were about 20 percent more likely to become drinkers or smokers themselves. iStockphoto hide caption

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Of Cigs And Selfies: Teens Imitate Risky Behavior Shared Online

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Hazel Avery, 86, holds her iPad for the first time. The Connecting to Community program, with funding from the AARP Foundation, teaches low-income seniors how to increase social engagement online. The Washington, D.C., program chose seniors with no previous computer experience. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Helping Low-Income Seniors Build A Social Web Online

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Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images

From the NPR Newscast: Giles Snyder reports

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Former NFL offensive lineman Brian Holloway in front of his home in Stephentown, N.Y., which teens trashed earlier this month. Michael Hill/AP hide caption

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Michael Hill/AP

Reporters watch the final minutes of the presidential debate between President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney last October in Denver. Doug Pensinger/Getty Images hide caption

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The new University Pages on LinkedIn show which businesses employ a college's graduates, and the sectors of the economy in which they work. LinkedIn hide caption

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NPR's Alt.Latino Host Jasmine Garsd posted this photo of her makeshift recording studio in Mexico City, where she's reporting for a few months. courtesy of Jasmine Garsd via Instagram hide caption

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courtesy of Jasmine Garsd via Instagram

This week, several women in the U.K. went public about explicit abuse they received on Twitter. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

As Twitter Expands Reach, Abuse Policy Gets Added Scrutiny

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Buzz, Georgia Tech's mascot, wasn't the only bug in the students' midst last fall. An outbreak of bacterial pneumonia sickened at least 83 in what the CDC called the largest known outbreak at a university in 35 years. Collegiate Images/Getty Images hide caption

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A New York radio reporter's brush with Internet fame led news outlets to set the "cubicle guy" story to music. This is a screen image from The Daily Beast's humorous take on the news. TheDailyBeastVideo hide caption

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