Haiti Haiti

After the earthquake in 2010, about 1,000 people were living in tents on the median of Highway 2, one of Haiti's busiest roads. Five years later, tens of thousands of people in Port-au-Prince still live in tents and other temporary housing. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Chief nursing officer Marc Julmisse (in glasses) leads nursing rounds inside the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti. Rebecca E. Rollins/Partners in Health hide caption

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Rebecca E. Rollins/Partners in Health

Anti-government protesters carry the body of a demonstrator who was shot to death during clashes with the National Police in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Saturday. Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe says he will step down in response to protesters' demands. Dieu Nalio Chery/AP hide caption

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Dieu Nalio Chery/AP

A Haitian woman holds cherries from a coffee tree. Haiti's coffee trade was once a flourishing industry, but it has been crippled by decades of deforestation, political chaos and now, climate change. Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov hide caption

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Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov

Climate Change Has Coffee Growers In Haiti Seeking Higher Ground

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Hedson Lamour, 28, prays with his color-coordinated band before performing. He entered the contest because his mom was a child slave. Frederic Dupoux for NPR hide caption

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Frederic Dupoux for NPR

A mother and child pass through Batey Bembe in the sugar-producing region near the town of Conseulo. Bateys are small, isolated communities made up of sugar cane workers and their families, often consisting of three or four generations. Sarah Tilotta for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Tilotta for NPR

Maman Pye cacao, a Haitian supertree, can produce 20 times as many cacao pods as ordinary trees, and the pods themselves are denser with cacao seeds than ordinary pods. Shutterstock hide caption

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Shutterstock

A makeshift latrine hangs over the water at the edge of Cite de Dieu, a slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. John W. Poole / NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole / NPR

Why Cholera Persists In Haiti Despite An Abundance Of Aid

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Haitians protest against United Nations peacekeepers in Port-au-Prince in 2010. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Boys at the L'Ecole Les Freres Clement elementary school in Jacmel, Haiti, line up to take deworming pills that protect against elephantiasis. Maggie Steber for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Maggie Steber for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Many homes that were rebuilt after the earthquake in 2010 are even more dangerous than the original ones. This three-story home was put up after the quake but is already slated for demolition to make way for an 18-unit housing project. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

What Happened To The Aid Meant To Rebuild Haiti?

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