Google Vice President Mario Queiroz talks about the uses of the new Google Home device during the keynote address of the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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With New Products, Google Flexes Muscles To Competitors, Regulators

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Google announced it is partnering with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles to expand its self-driving car project. This is the first time Google has worked directly with an automaker to integrate its self-driving technology into a passenger vehicle. FCA US LLC hide caption

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South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol reviews the match with other professional Go players after the fourth match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Achievement Unlocked: Google AlphaGo A.I. Wins Go Series, 4-1

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Smartphone assistants like Siri will give you a national help line to call when you bring up suicide. But they have trouble recognizing other things, like rape or physical abuse. Michael Nagle/Getty Images hide caption

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Journalists watch a big screen showing live footage of the third game of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match between Lee Sedol, one of the greatest modern players of the ancient board game Go, and the Google-developed supercomputer AlphaGo at a hotel in Seoul on Saturday. AlphaGo won, clinching its victory in the best-of-5 match. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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South Korean Go player Lee Sedol reviews the match after resigning, giving Google's artificial intelligence program AlphaGo a two-game lead in their five-game series in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Champion professional Go player Lee Sedol (right) makes a move in his match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, at the Google DeepMind Challenge Match in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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South Korean Go champion Lee Sedol (right) poses with Google DeepMind head Demis Hassabis. On Wednesday, Sedol will begin a five-match series against a computer. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How Google's Neural Network Hopes To Beat A 'Go' World Champion

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Following the example set in Pakistan, the government of Bangladesh is having the mobile operator Grameenphone, which is majority-owned by Telenor, fingerprint SIM card customers. This is an FAQ on the biometric program. Grameenphone hide caption

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After Terrorist Attack, A Phone Company Is Beating Google At Big Data

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While other automakers are working on a gradual progression toward more automation in cars, Google has its eyes on a fully automated self-driving car. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Google Makes The Case For A Hands-Off Approach To Self-Driving Cars

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Charlize, 8, plays with the Kidizoom Multimedia Digital Camera made by VTech in 2009. A recent data breach hacking sensitive information, including kid's photos, is prompting parents to look twice at their children's technology usage. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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At School And At Home, How Much Does The Internet Know About Kids?

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Google's self-driving prototype car can be found cruising the streets near the Internet company's Silicon Valley headquarters to test programming responses to a variety of situations. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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