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Danielle Brown speaks during TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2016. She is Google's new chief diversity officer, a position she previously held at Intel. Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch

Is The Memo Controversy A Pivot Point On Diversity For Google?

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai says that he supports the right of workers to express themselves but that a senior engineer's memo had gone too far. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Google CEO Cuts Vacation Short To Deal With Crisis Over Diversity Memo

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Google executives say their company is committed to inclusion, after an engineer's criticisms of its diversity efforts sparked conversations outside the company this weekend. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Google CEO Sundar Pichai delivers the keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17 in Mountain View, Calif. Google's new tool for tracking how online ads connect to in-person sales has been criticized by a privacy watchdog group. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Google CEO Sundar Pichai talks about the new Google Assistant during a 2016 product event in San Francisco. The voice assistant is one of a number of Google products that will provide user data to the curation service that the company is launching Wednesday. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

With Entry Into Interest Curation, Google Goes Head-To-Head With Facebook

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A man walks past a building on the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. Google search results about health can be influential, but sometimes they can be unreliable or wrong. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Seeking Online Medical Advice? Google's Top Results Aren't Always On Target

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Evaldas Rimasauskas walks into court in May in Vilnius, Lithuania. On Monday, the court ruled that Rimasauskas, allegedly behind a massive email scheme, must be extradited to the U.S. to stand trial. Mindaugas Kulbis/AP hide caption

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Mindaugas Kulbis/AP

EU antitrust Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, pictured last summer, announced a fine against Google over the way it ranks shopping services in its search results. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Darko Vojinovic/AP

Google has announced it will no longer scan users' emails to target ads. Above, the company's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ke Jie, the world's No. 1 Go player, stares at the board during his second match against AlphaGo in Wuzhen, China, on Thursday. The 19-year-old grandmaster dropped the match in the best-of-three series against Google's artificial intelligence program. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Spectators watch the world's top-ranked Go player, Ke Jie, square off against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen, China, on Tuesday. The program beat Ke in the first of three planned matches. Peng Peng/AP hide caption

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Peng Peng/AP

Dan Howley tries out the Google Daydream View virtual-reality headset and controller on Oct. 4, 2016, following a product event in San Francisco. This week, Google announced plans for stand-alone VR goggles that won't need to be attached to a PC or smartphone. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Google wants to pump 1.5 million gallons of water per day to cool servers at its data center in Berkeley County, S.C. "It's great to have Google in this region," conservationist Emily Cedzo said. "So by no means are we going after Google ... Our concern, primarily, is the source of that water." Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

Google Moves In And Wants To Pump 1.5 Million Gallons Of Water Per Day

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This is what the subject line may look like in the email, for people using Microsoft Outlook. The telltale sign something's amiss: that email address with that long line of H's. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

Google launched its first servers in Cuba this week. Above, people use public Wi-Fi to connect their devices on a Havana street in October 2016. Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images

Students at Howard University in Washington, D.C. The historically black university is opening Howard West at Google's headquarters in Mountain View. Howard University hide caption

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Howard University

Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

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Google says it will improve its internal systems and give advertisers more control of where their spots appear, responding to complaints about the pairing of paid ads with offensive content. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Anthony Levandowski, who co-founded Otto and is now head of Uber's self-driving-vehicle project, is accused of taking proprietary designs and information with him when he left the Google spinoff Waymo. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images