A California driver who received a ticket for wearing a Google Glass headset this week says the existing laws are unclear. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

An employee drives a Google Maps Street View car around Palo Alto, Calif. The U.S. Court of Appeals in San Francisco said Tuesday that Google went far beyond listening to accessible radio communication when it drew information from inside people's homes. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

toggle caption Paul Sakuma/AP

Switching To Gmail May Leave Reporters' Sources At Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/212678437/212708724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image shows the new Digg Reader, built as an option to replace Google Reader. The RSS subscription service will be discontinued on July 1, Google says. Digg hide caption

toggle caption Digg

Google was recently allowed to release general data about national security letters it receives, as seen in this chart. The company is now asking the U.S. government to allow it to publish similar data on national security requests, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Google hide caption

toggle caption Google

Internet giant Google has recognized the Palestinians' upgraded U.N. status, placing the name "Palestine" on its search engine instead of "Palestinian Territories." Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images

For Palestinians, Google's Small Change Is A Big Deal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/183966785/183993739" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A visitor at the "NEXT Berlin" conference tries out Google Glass on April 24 in Berlin. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption AFP/Getty Images

Google Fights Glass Backlash Before It Even Hits The Street

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/183468218/183538988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man's shadow reflects on a bus with an ad for Gmail in Lagos, Nigeria. Google has introduced Inactive Account Manager to help plan for digital life after death. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

toggle caption Sunday Alamba/AP