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Google's self-driving prototype car can be found cruising the streets near the Internet company's Silicon Valley headquarters to test programming responses to a variety of situations. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

You can find your audio commands by visiting your Google voice and audio activity history page. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

OK Google: Where Do You Store Recordings Of My Commands?

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A librarian working with the Google Books project in Ann Arbor, Mich., helps a giant desktop machine scan a rare, centuries-old Bible in 2008. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Since 2004, Google has scanned more than 20 million books as part of an electronic database, such as these volumes at the University of Michigan's Buhr Shelving Facility. Mandi Wright/AP hide caption

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Mandi Wright/AP

A person plays Candy Crush Saga on his tablet in Lille, northern France. This year, mobile games revenues are expected to fly past console games and hit more than $30 billion worldwide. Philippe Hugen /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Hugen /AFP/Getty Images

Apple TV, App Makers Try To Move Casual Gamers To Bigger Screen

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Both Google and Samsung are rolling out new processes to issue security updates for Android devices, like the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Under Pressure, Google Promises To Update Android Security Regularly

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A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Major Flaw In Android Phones Would Let Hackers In With Just A Text

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