Both Google and Samsung are rolling out new processes to issue security updates for Android devices, like the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Under Pressure, Google Promises To Update Android Security Regularly

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A security gap on Android, the most popular smartphone operating system, was discovered by security experts in a lab and is so far not widely exploited. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Major Flaw In Android Phones Would Let Hackers In With Just A Text

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Samsung Is On A Roll, But Can It Beat Apple?

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The iPhone app Electronic Smoke simulates smoking by detecting sound waves. When you breathe into the microphone, the virtual cigarette burns. Screenshot from Electronic Smoke. hide caption

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Screenshot from Electronic Smoke.

A screengrab shows the Google Wallet app being used to pay for items at a CVS store.

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Google

Mobile Payment Apps Put Wallets In Phones, Not Pockets

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