The official FBI seal is seen on an iPhone camera screen outside the agency's headquarters. With help from a third party, the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by one of San Bernardino shooters. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The Next Apple-FBI Question: Who Can Know How The iPhone Was Hacked?

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Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., have introduced encryption legislation. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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The Next Encryption Battleground: Congress

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Brittney Mills (center) stands with her mother, Barbara (left), and a family friend at her baby shower days before Brittney was killed. Aarti Shahani/NPR; Original photo courtesy of Barbara Mills hide caption

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Mom Asks: Who Will Unlock Murdered Daughter's iPhone?

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A customer tries out a new iPhone at an Apple store in Chicago. The FBI is working with a "third party" to test a method of seeing what's inside the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters without Apple's help. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the latest version of the iPhone on Monday in Cupertino, Calif. The company's legal fight with the FBI may be at an end, or at least a detente, if a third party's suggestion lets the agency hack into the San Bernardino shooters' encrypted iPhone. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell (left) listens to FBI Director James Comey testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Lawyer Ted Olson, shown at the Los Angeles premiere of HBO's The Case Against 8 in 2014, is representing Apple in its legal faceoff with federal investigators. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Lawyer For Apple: 'What In The Law Requires Us To Redesign The iPhone?'

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San Bernardino Chief of Police Jarrod Burguan says the search of the iPhone used by one of the shooters is "an effort to leave no stone unturned" in the investigation of the Dec. 2 terrorist attack. Robert Gauthier/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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San Bernardino Police Chief Sees Chance Nothing Of Value On Shooter's iPhone

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An iPhone user attends a rally at the Apple flagship store in Manhattan on Tuesday to support the company's refusal to help the FBI access an encrypted iPhone. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Gates says that in the dispute between Apple and the FBI over a court order to unlock an iPhone, he sides with the FBI. Other tech company executives have sided with Apple — including Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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A customer tries out the Apple iPhone 6S on Sept. 25, 2015, in Chicago. As a legal dispute simmers, Apple CEO Tim Cook and FBI Director James Comey issue separate calls for more conversations about privacy and security in the smartphone era. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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In Apple Dispute, FBI Director Urges A 'Deep Breath' Over Phone Security

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A U.S. magistrate judge has ordered Apple to help the FBI break into an iPhone used by one of the two shooters in the San Bernardino attack in December. iStockphoto hide caption

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Can A 1789 Law Apply To An iPhone?

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Marc Rotenberg, head of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, opposes phones that would have a built-in backdoor. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A Privacy Advocate's View Of Ordering Apple To Help Unlock Shooter's iPhone

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Siri's answer to the brain-teaser question "What's zero divided by zero" generates a response that people find both funny and unnerving. NPR hide caption

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Asked To Divide Zero By Zero, Siri Waxes Philosophical (And Personal)

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As the Apple Watch goes on sale Friday, it's unclear if the gadget and others like it can attain the utility and prominence smartphones have in the past eight years. Ryan Emberley/AP hide caption

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Will Apple's Newest Gadget Ignite A Smart Watch Movement?

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