FBI Director James Comey testifies March 1 before the House Judiciary Committee on the encryption of the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino attackers. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The official FBI seal is seen on an iPhone camera screen outside the agency's headquarters. With help from a third party, the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by one of San Bernardino shooters. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The Next Apple-FBI Question: Who Can Know How The iPhone Was Hacked?

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Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., have introduced encryption legislation. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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The Next Encryption Battleground: Congress

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Brittney Mills (center) stands with her mother, Barbara (left), and a family friend at her baby shower days before Brittney was killed. Aarti Shahani/NPR; Original photo courtesy of Barbara Mills hide caption

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Mom Asks: Who Will Unlock Murdered Daughter's iPhone?

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A customer tries out a new iPhone at an Apple store in Chicago. The FBI is working with a "third party" to test a method of seeing what's inside the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters without Apple's help. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the latest version of the iPhone on Monday in Cupertino, Calif. The company's legal fight with the FBI may be at an end, or at least a detente, if a third party's suggestion lets the agency hack into the San Bernardino shooters' encrypted iPhone. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell (left) listens to FBI Director James Comey testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Lawyer Ted Olson, shown at the Los Angeles premiere of HBO's The Case Against 8 in 2014, is representing Apple in its legal faceoff with federal investigators. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Lawyer For Apple: 'What In The Law Requires Us To Redesign The iPhone?'

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San Bernardino Chief of Police Jarrod Burguan says the search of the iPhone used by one of the shooters is "an effort to leave no stone unturned" in the investigation of the Dec. 2 terrorist attack. Robert Gauthier/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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San Bernardino Police Chief Sees Chance Nothing Of Value On Shooter's iPhone

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