ethics ethics

White House staffers may need assistance from a legal defense fund if special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe pulls them in for questioning. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway said in an interview on Thursday that the federal disclosure rules could be too cumbersome. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Outgoing ethics director Walter Shaub said in January that President Trump's plan to reduce conflicts of interest "doesn't meet the standards ... that every president in the past four decades has met." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ethics Office Director Walter Shaub Resigns, Saying Rules Need To Be Tougher

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A watchdog group contends that U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley violated the Hatch Act for retweeting a political message from the president. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh (left) and District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine announce a lawsuit against President Trump over conflicts of interest with his businesses on Monday in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump pledged that the Trump Organization would donate profits from foreign governments, but the top Democrat in the House Oversight Committee says the organization does not appear to be following through. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump's property Le Chateau des Palmiers is on the market. It comes complete with a potential conflict of interest. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Sale Of Trump Property Raises Ethical Questions About Potential Buyer's Motives

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Walter Shaub, director of the United States Office of Government Ethics. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

As Trump Inquiries Flood Ethics Office, Director Looks To House For Action

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At a Jan. 11 news conference at Trump Tower on in New York City, President-elect Trump gestures at a stack of folders that he said contained documentation separating him from his businesses. That revocable trust was modified about a month later to let Trump withdraw from it at any time, ProPublica reports. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The U.S. Department of Justice is one of several parts of the government that have the power to hold the president and his appointees accountable on ethics. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images