Women smoke in New York City's Times Square. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Health workers in Nepal culled chickens and destroyed eggs following an outbreak of bird flu in Kathmandu in October 2012. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Two chimps groom each other at the Save the Chimps facility in Florida. The National Institutes of Health owns about 360 chimpanzees that aren't yet retired and that are living at research facilities; new guidelines say most of its chimps should be retired. Save the Chimps hide caption

itoggle caption Save the Chimps

Students at the University of Washington used a protein-folding program initially funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to come up with a treatment for celiac disease. DARPA hide caption

itoggle caption DARPA

If you know some mice that took This Is Spinal Tap too literally, they might want to know about an experiment to restore hearing with a failed Alzheimer's drug. The Kobal Collection hide caption

itoggle caption The Kobal Collection

Brain scans using Amyvid dye to highlight beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. Clockwise from top left: a cognitively normal subject; an amyloid-positive patient with Alzheimer's disease; a patient with mild cognitive impairment who progressed to dementia during a study; and a patient with mild cognitive impairment. Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology hide caption

itoggle caption Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology

Rufus, 46, now lives on an island in a Florida sanctuary run by Save the Chimps. Before his rescue, Rufus lived in a facility Save the Chimps calls "the dungeon." Courtesy of Save the Chimps hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Save the Chimps

Chimpanzees check out a termite mound at the Chimp Haven sanctuary in Louisiana. Chimp Haven hide caption

itoggle caption Chimp Haven

For centuries, Russians believed putting a brown frog in their milk would keep it fresh. Now scientists are finding chemicals in the frog's slimy goo that inhibit the growth of bacteria and fungi. Stefan Arendt/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Stefan Arendt/Corbis