University of California, Davis food safety field scientists Michele Jay-Russell, Paula Kahn-Rivadeneira, Anna Zwieniecka, Navreen Pandher and Peiman Aminabadi celebrate the first day of their experiment testing E. coli survival in soil. Courtesy of Fhon Saharuetai hide caption

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Courtesy of Fhon Saharuetai

Researchers stroked babies' faces with a paintbrush while they watched the same thing happening to a baby in a video. How long the babies in the experiment watched the screen gave clues to what they were thinking. Courtesy of Maria Laura Filippetti hide caption

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Courtesy of Maria Laura Filippetti

The plate on the left contains about equal numbers of colonies of two different bacteria. After the bacteria compete and evolve, the lighter ones have taken the lead in the plate on the right. Courtesy of Michael Wiser hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Wiser

Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops

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An anatomical drawing shows the ligaments on the outside surface of the knee. The anterolateral ligament connects the thigh bone to the shinbone. Courtesy of University Hospitals Leuven hide caption

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Courtesy of University Hospitals Leuven

Bob Adams is a lab animal veterinarian at Johns Hopkins University. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

Shutdown Imperils Costly Lab Mice, Years Of Research

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The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

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Classical mechanics, represented by Isaac Newton, typically doesn't play nicely with quantum mechanics, represented by Schrodinger's cat. But the 2013 Nobel laureates for chemistry figured out a way to get the two to work together. Courtesy of the Nobel Prize hide caption

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Courtesy of the Nobel Prize

Tourists are dwarfed by the Very Large Array in 2005. The facility, on the Plains of San Agustin, 50 miles west of Socorro, N.M., has been closed as a result of the government shutdown. The VLA consists of 27 radio antennas linked together to simulate the capabilities of a single dish 17 miles in diameter. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

From left: Randy Schekman, Thomas Suedhof and James Rothman shared the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Reuters /Landov