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Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project at the University of Colorado in Boulder, works in the lab where the samples are processed. The American Gut Project hide caption

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The American Gut Project

When the wrong cells take over, scientists' experiments can be derailed. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Scientists Often Skip A Simple Test That Could Verify Their Work

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Georgetown's Robert Clark says it's very difficult to say precisely how many experiments have been spoiled by contaminated cell lines. Phil Humnicky/Courtesy of Georgetown University hide caption

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Phil Humnicky/Courtesy of Georgetown University

Mistaken Identities Plague Lab Work With Human Cells

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Do you want to go to the park? Mango Doucleff, of San Francisco, responds to her favorite command by perking up her ears and tilting her head. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR

How Dogs Understand What We Say

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A turkey vulture makes quick work of a dead rabbit at Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline park in Oakland, Calif. Sebastian Kennerknecht/Minden/Corbis hide caption

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Sebastian Kennerknecht/Minden/Corbis

How Can Vultures Eat Rotten Roadkill And Survive?

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Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome virus particles cling to the surface of an infected cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID/Flickr

How A Tilt Toward Safety Stopped A Scientist's Virus Research

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Women participate in a breast cancer fund-raising in Denver in 2011. Despite decades of awareness campaigns, the survival rate for women with metastatic breast cancer hasn't improved. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post/AP hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post/AP

Caltech biochemical engineer Frances Arnold was awarded a National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama in 2013. Jason Reed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jason Reed/Reuters/Landov

Is 'Leaning In' The Only Formula For Women's Success In Science?

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Caribous doing their business in mountain ice have left a viral record hundreds of years old. Courtesy of Brian Moorman hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Moorman

Ancient Viruses Lurk In Frozen Caribou Poo

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