A guinea pig does its part for science and human relations by sitting on the lap of an autistic child. Erin Burnett/Courtesy of Maggie O'Haire hide caption

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For some kids who grow up in poverty, the bond developed with Mom is especially important in dealing with stress. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Perch exposed to the anxiety drug oxazepam were more daring and ate more quickly than fish that lived in drug-free water. Courtesy of Bent Christensen hide caption

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Car commercial? Nope. Jessica Richman, Zachary Apte (center) and William Ludington are looking to the crowd for money to fund uBiome, which will sequence the genetic code of microbes that live on and inside humans. Courtesy of uBiome hide caption

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The painkiller diclofenac is sold under several brand names in the U.S. and abroad, including Voltaren. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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More than 400 guns, including these three, were turned in during a Dallas gun buyback program in January. But determining the effectiveness of such programs is difficult due to limits on gun-related research. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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Movies like The Shining frighten most of us, but some brain-damaged people feel no fear when they watch a scary film. However, an unseen threat — air with a high level of carbon dioxide — produces a surprising result. Warner Bros./Photofest hide caption

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Nurse Christel Petersen inoculates a child in the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative study in 2011. Rodger Bosch/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Mitchell is autistic and wants to donate his brain to science when he dies. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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