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Bernice Singleton (left), one of the original mothers in the research project, is seen with her daughter Jenny and granddaughter Gretta. Paige Cowett/WNYC hide caption

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Paige Cowett/WNYC

What Causes Breast Cancer? These Families Want To Help Find Out

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Harvard University student Elana Simon introduces President Obama before he spoke at the White House Friday about an initiative to encourage research into more precise medicine. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

A scorpion fly perches on a leaf at the research farm where Lindgren studied the decomposition of human remains. Scorpion flies are among the first insects to visit a corpse. Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren hide caption

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Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren

U.S. funding for medical research by source, 1994-2012. (Data were adjusted to 2012 dollars using the Biomedical Research and Development Price Index.) American Medical Association hide caption

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American Medical Association

Dr. Richard Schlegel and postdoctoral fellow Nancy Palechor-Ceron use a microscope to look at human epithelial cells growing on mouse fibroblasts at Georgetown University Medical Center. Lauren Wolkoff/Georgetown University hide caption

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Lauren Wolkoff/Georgetown University

A Bed Of Mouse Cells Helps Human Cells Thrive In The Lab

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How would you sound in front of an NPR microphone? Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

How A Position Of Power Can Change Your Voice

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Postdoctoral researcher Jennifer Foulke-Abel holds the gut-on-a-chip inside the lab at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Create Artificial Organs That Fit In Your Hand

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Rob Knight, co-founder of the American Gut Project at the University of Colorado in Boulder, works in the lab where the samples are processed. The American Gut Project hide caption

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The American Gut Project

When the wrong cells take over, scientists' experiments can be derailed. Chris Nickels for NPR hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Scientists Often Skip A Simple Test That Could Verify Their Work

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Georgetown's Robert Clark says it's very difficult to say precisely how many experiments have been spoiled by contaminated cell lines. Phil Humnicky/Courtesy of Georgetown University hide caption

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Phil Humnicky/Courtesy of Georgetown University

Mistaken Identities Plague Lab Work With Human Cells

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