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This genetically modified yeast can convert sugar into powerful opioid drugs. Scientists working with the modified yeast strains are required to register them with the Drug Enforcement Administration and keep the yeast under lock and key. Courtesy of Christina Smolke/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Christina Smolke/Stanford University

Engineers Make Narcotics With Yeast. Is Home-Brewed Heroin Next?

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Researcher John Clements in the early 1980s, after he figured out that lungs need surfactants to breathe. David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF hide caption

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David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF

How A Scientist's Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies' Lives

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A nanosecond pulsed laser beam starts the photoacoustic imaging process. Geoff Story/Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis hide caption

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Geoff Story/Courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis

A Scientist Deploys Light And Sound To Reveal The Brain

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Nephrologist Mitchell Lunn (left) and OB-GYN Juno Obedin-Maliver want to hear about the health issues on the minds of members the LGBTQ community. Susan Merrell/Courtesy of UCSF hide caption

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Susan Merrell/Courtesy of UCSF

Researchers say that inside the head of the worm C. elegans, an antenna-like structure at the tip of the AFD neuron (highlighted in green) is the first identified sensor for Earth's magnetic field. Andrés Vidal-Gadea hide caption

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Andrés Vidal-Gadea

This fungus among us — baker's yeast, aka Saccharomyces cerevisiae — is useful for more than just making bread. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

You And Yeast Have More In Common Than You Might Think

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The blood cancer in soft-shell clams poses no risk to humans, but it does kill the shellfish. Pat Wellenbach/AP hide caption

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Pat Wellenbach/AP

Clam Cancer Spreads Along Eastern Seaboard

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Prion protein can be infectious, spreading from cell to cell in the brain. Here four nerve cells in a mouse illustrate how infectious prion protein moves within cells along neurites — wire-like connections the nerve cells use for communicating with adjacent cells. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Mad Cow Research Hints At Ways To Halt Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

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Bernice Singleton (left), one of the original mothers in the research project, is seen with her daughter Jenny and granddaughter Gretta. Paige Cowett/WNYC hide caption

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Paige Cowett/WNYC

What Causes Breast Cancer? These Families Want To Help Find Out

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Harvard University student Elana Simon introduces President Obama before he spoke at the White House Friday about an initiative to encourage research into more precise medicine. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

A scorpion fly perches on a leaf at the research farm where Lindgren studied the decomposition of human remains. Scorpion flies are among the first insects to visit a corpse. Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren hide caption

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Courtesy of Natalie Lindgren