research : Shots - Health News research

The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Jonathan Coleman and his son compare graphene-infused Silly Putty (left) with the unadulterated kids stuff. Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin hide caption

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Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin

Adding A Funny Form Of Carbon To Silly Putty Creates A Heart Monitor

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The federal government spends more than $30 billion a year to fund the National Institutes of Health. What changes are in store under a new administration? NIH/Flickr hide caption

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NIH/Flickr

Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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In this file photo, a professor holds a tray of stem cells at the University of Connecticut. The NIH plans to lift a moratorium on funding studies using human stem cells in animal embryos. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Chimera Quandary: Is It Ethical To Create Hybrid Embryos?

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Pablo Ross of the University of California, Davis, inserts human stem cells into a pig embryo as part of experiments to create chimeric embryos. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

NIH Plans To Lift Ban On Research Funds For Part-Human, Part-Animal Embryos

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Scan of an armored poacher, Xeneretmus triacanthus. UW Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers hide caption

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UW Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers

From 'The Water's Edge To The Cutting Edge': Fish Skeletons, CT Scans And Engineering

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