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Some doctors say clinicians can now get much more information from newer technology than they can get from a stethoscope. Clinging to the old tool isn't necessary, they say. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

The Stethoscope: Timeless Tool Or Outdated Relic?

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Google was told by the National Highway Traffic Administration earlier this month that the self-driving car system can be considered as a driver. San Jose Mercury News/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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San Jose Mercury News/TNS via Getty Images

What's Next For Self-Driving Cars?

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A group at MIT built this tiny package of sensors to collect vital signs as it travels through the digestive system. Albert Swiston/MIT hide caption

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Albert Swiston/MIT

A Tiny Pill Monitors Vital Signs From Deep Inside The Body

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Asma Khan of Chicago at the booth for her business, Soap Ethics. Monique Parsons for NPR hide caption

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Monique Parsons for NPR

Startups Cater To Muslim Millennials With Dating Apps And Vegan Halal Soap

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People can now contribute to presidential campaigns with just a few taps on a smartphone. Jonathan Alcorn/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Alcorn/AFP/Getty Images

#Cashtag: Twitter To Allow Direct Campaign Contributions

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The PharmaChk is a bit like a litmus test for drugs: You pop in a pill at one end, and in 15 minutes, a number appears on a screen telling you the drug's potency. Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR hide caption

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Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR

Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of pingpong. Courtesy of Andela hide caption

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Courtesy of Andela

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

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At a Minecraft camp in Shaker Heights, Ohio, kids trade secrets about making their virtual worlds come to life. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Sometimes A Little More Minecraft May Be Quite All Right

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