smartphone smartphone

SwiftKey analyzed more than a billion pieces of emoji data, organized by language and country. The poop emoji was most popular in Canada. Unicode/Apple hide caption

toggle caption
Unicode/Apple

Canadians Love Poop, Americans Love Pizza: How Emojis Fare Worldwide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402003080/402514908" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biometrics are increasingly replacing the password for user identification. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Biometrics May Ditch The Password, But Not The Hackers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401466507/401781559" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Customers at Honeygrow in Philadelphia can charge their cellphones while they dine using one of Doug Baldasare's kiosks. Emma Lee/For NewsWorks hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Lee/For NewsWorks

Businesses Woo Customers With Free Phone-Charging Stations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/247161881/247765490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Austin Wierschke, left, of Rhinelander, Wis., and Kent Augustine, of Jamaica, N.Y., compete during the final round of the 2012 LG U.S. National Texting Championship on Wednesday, in New York. Wierschke won the championship for the second time in a row. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mary Altaffer/AP