The posterior end of the Loa loa worm is visible on the left. The disease-causing worm can now be located with a smartphone/microscope hookup. That's a big help because a drug to treat river blindness can be risky if the patient is carrying the worm. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Smartphones Can Be Smart Enough To Find A Parasitic Worm

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SwiftKey analyzed more than a billion pieces of emoji data, organized by language and country. The poop emoji was most popular in Canada. Unicode/Apple hide caption

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Unicode/Apple

Canadians Love Poop, Americans Love Pizza: How Emojis Fare Worldwide

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Biometrics are increasingly replacing the password for user identification. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Biometrics May Ditch The Password, But Not The Hackers

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Customers at Honeygrow in Philadelphia can charge their cellphones while they dine using one of Doug Baldasare's kiosks. Emma Lee/For NewsWorks hide caption

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Emma Lee/For NewsWorks

Businesses Woo Customers With Free Phone-Charging Stations

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