Internet Internet

California's new digital privacy law essentially requires a warrant before any business turns over any of its clients' metadata or digital communications to the government. Hailshadow/iStockphoto hide caption

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Hailshadow/iStockphoto

People huddle in front of the Habana Libre hotel in Havana, trying to get on the Internet. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Internet Access Expands In Cuba — For Those Who Can Afford It

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Miami swimwear entrepreneur Mel Valenzuela (right) explains online strategies to Cuban business owners Victor Rodriguez (middle) and Caridad Limonta (left) in Wynwood this month. Miami boutique owner Monica Minagorri (rear) watches. Tim Padgett/WLRN hide caption

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Tim Padgett/WLRN

Genevieve Bell, an anthropologist and vice president at Intel Corp., with teammate David Weinberger, senior researcher at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Google is doing test flights of its balloons carrying Internet routers around the world. Last June, a balloon was released at the airport in Teresina, Brazil. Google hide caption

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Google

Bringing Internet To The Far Corners Of The Earth

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The Havana studio of prominent artist Kcho is ringed by Cubans with their heads buried in screens. Users say the only other free Internet connection in Havana is at the U.S. Interests Section. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR

An Object Of Desire: Hope And Yearning For The Internet In Cuba

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Jonathan Zittrain, co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, says the right to be forgotten online is "a very bad solution to a real problem." Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Should The U.S. Adopt The 'Right To Be Forgotten' Online?

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Since Google Fiber rolled out gigabit broadband in Kansas City four years ago, residents have enjoyed fast Internet connections, including what locals call "the world's fastest Starbucks." Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

In Kansas City, Superfast Internet And A Digital Divide

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Front Porch Forum co-founders Michael and Valerie Wood-Lewis run the company from their home office in Burlington, Vt. Angela Evancie/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Angela Evancie/Vermont Public Radio

In Vermont, A Hyper-Local Online Forum Brings Neighbors Together

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