Internet Internet

The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

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ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

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A Google broadband technician installs a fiber-optic network at a home of one of the early Google Fiber customers in Kansas City, Kan., in 2012. Julie Denesha/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Aspiring Internet star Huang Xian'er (right) live-streams a chat with a guest about hiking around Beijing. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

China's Internet Stars Embrace Lowbrow — And Aim For High Profits

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Author Tim Wu says that much of the content on the Internet is created by businesses that are on a "quest for clicks." PeopleImages.com/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages.com/Getty Images

How Free Web Content Traps People In An Abyss Of Ads And Clickbait

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A man poses with a sign of Pepe the Frog outside Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., site of Monday's first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters
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Republicans Say Obama Administration Is Giving Away The Internet

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Listen: 'Web Site Story,' NPR's Musical About The Internet — From 1999

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Comcast's discounted program, called Internet Essentials, is expanding beyond families with schoolchildren. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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