Internet Internet

A man walks past a building on the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. Google search results about health can be influential, but sometimes they can be unreliable or wrong. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Seeking Online Medical Advice? Google's Top Results Aren't Always On Target

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The Federal Communications Commission is accepting public comment on its proposal to loosen the "net neutrality" rules placed on Internet providers in 2015. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Internet Companies Plan Online Campaign To Keep Net Neutrality Rules

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Harold Cardenas Lema runs the blog La Joven Cuba out of the two-room apartment he shares with his mom and girlfriend. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

In Cuba, Growing Numbers Of Bloggers Manage To Operate In A Vulnerable Gray Area

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It's already difficult to create distance from the technology that surrounds us, but as connectivity increases, it might become impossible to do so. Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images

Online sales are growing by about 15 percent each year, but states say they're not getting their fair share of taxes from e-commerce. razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Massachusetts Tries Something New To Claim Taxes From Online Sales

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Mark Fiore for KQED

Is 'Internet Addiction' Real?

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Walt Mossberg has been reporting on technology since the 1990s. He plans to retire in June. Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg hide caption

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Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg

After Decades Covering It, Tech Still Amazes Walt Mossberg

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Google wants to pump 1.5 million gallons of water per day to cool servers at its data center in Berkeley County, S.C. "It's great to have Google in this region," conservationist Emily Cedzo said. "So by no means are we going after Google ... Our concern, primarily, is the source of that water." Bruce Smith/AP hide caption

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Bruce Smith/AP

Google Moves In And Wants To Pump 1.5 Million Gallons Of Water Per Day

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Tim Berners-Lee still largely sees the potential of the Web, but it has not turned out to be the complete cyber Utopian dream he had hoped. Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook claims to have 1.23 billion daily users globally. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that he wants that number to grow and for users to conduct their digital lives only on his platform. bombuscreative/iStock hide caption

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bombuscreative/iStock

Facebook Wants Great Power, But What About Responsibility?

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The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

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ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

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