Tim Berners-Lee still largely sees the potential of the Web, but it has not turned out to be the complete cyber Utopian dream he had hoped. Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook claims to have 1.23 billion daily users globally. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that he wants that number to grow and for users to conduct their digital lives only on his platform. bombuscreative/iStock hide caption

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Facebook Wants Great Power, But What About Responsibility?

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The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

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ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

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A Google broadband technician installs a fiber-optic network at a home of one of the early Google Fiber customers in Kansas City, Kan., in 2012. Julie Denesha/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Aspiring Internet star Huang Xian'er (right) live-streams a chat with a guest about hiking around Beijing. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

China's Internet Stars Embrace Lowbrow — And Aim For High Profits

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Author Tim Wu says that much of the content on the Internet is created by businesses that are on a "quest for clicks." PeopleImages.com/Getty Images hide caption

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How Free Web Content Traps People In An Abyss Of Ads And Clickbait

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A man poses with a sign of Pepe the Frog outside Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., site of Monday's first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters hide caption

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Republicans Say Obama Administration Is Giving Away The Internet

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Listen: 'Web Site Story,' NPR's Musical About The Internet — From 1999

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