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FBI Director James Comey testifies March 1 before the House Judiciary Committee on the encryption of the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino attackers. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Apple's online movie and book services have been closed down in China — reportedly on the orders of Chinese censors. Here, an Apple Store in Shenyang is decorated for Earth Day this week. VCG via Getty Image hide caption

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VCG via Getty Image

FBI Executive Assistant Director for Science and Technology Amy Hess (from left) testifies on encryption Tuesday before a House panel, alongside the New York City Police Department's Thomas Galati and Indiana State Police Office Capt. Charles Cohen. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The official FBI seal is seen on an iPhone camera screen outside the agency's headquarters. With help from a third party, the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by one of San Bernardino shooters. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Next Apple-FBI Question: Who Can Know How The iPhone Was Hacked?

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Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., have introduced encryption legislation. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

The Next Encryption Battleground: Congress

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Prosecutor Cody Hiland speaks at a news conference in Conway, Ark., on Aug. 7, after two teenagers were charged in the murders of Robert and Patricia Cogdell. On Wednesday, the FBI agreed to help the Faulkner County prosecutor get access to an iPhone and iPod that belonged to the suspects. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

A protester supporting Apple in its battle against the FBI holds up an iPhone that reads "No Entry" outside an Apple store in New York on Feb. 23. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

Apple Vs. The FBI: The Unanswered Questions And Unsettled Issues

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