Jamie Shupe, 52, was born male, married a woman and had a child. But Shupe felt neither male nor fully female. Now, an Oregon judge has allowed Shupe to identify as non-binary, believed to be a first in the United States. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB News hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB News

Neither Male Nor Female: Oregon Resident Legally Recognized As Third Gender

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The Triborough Bridge is seen under construction in New York City on July 10, 1935. The bridge, now known as the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge, connects Long Island with Manhattan. The Dutch Prime Minister is a fan of the biographer of Robert Moses, who was involved in building the bridge. Associated Press hide caption

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Associated Press

Navy Secretary Raymond Mabus (far right) and (to his right) Marine Corps Gen. Robert Neller testify Tuesday on Capitol Hill during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Indian athlete Dutee Chand has been fighting the ban for "hyperandrogenism," or the presence of high levels of testosterone in the body, that has made her ineligible to compete as a sprinter. Rafiq Maqbool/AP hide caption

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Rafiq Maqbool/AP

Sarah Johnson makes a call during the first half of an April 2014 preseason NFL football game between the Seattle Seahawks and the San Diego Chargers. Stephen Brashear/AP hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/AP

There's a widely held assumption that a slight imbalance in male births has its start at the very moment of conception. But researchers say factors later in pregnancy are more likely to explain the phenomenon. CNRI/Science Source hide caption

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CNRI/Science Source

Why Are More Baby Boys Born Than Girls?

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Ellen Pao, a former partner at Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, says women were excluded from all-male meetings at the company and denied seats on boards. The firm says she was fired for poor performance. Robert Galbraith/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Robert Galbraith/Reuters/Landov

Sex Discrimination Trial Puts Silicon Valley Under The Microscope

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