Olympic team members stand on the field as the Olympic flag flies at half-staff during a memorial service in the Munich Olympic Stadium in Germany on Sept. 6, 1972. Eleven Israeli team members were killed by Arab guerrillas at the Summer Olympic Games. A crowd of 80,000 filled the stadium to capacity. AP hide caption

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Monument Underway For Slain 1972 Israeli Olympians

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Charlotte Hornets' Jeremy Lindrives past Sacramento Kings' Omri Casspi in the second half of a game on Nov. 23. The Hornets won 127-122 in overtime. The Kings haven't won a championship since 1951. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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There Are No Winners Without Losers

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Members of the University of Missouri Tigers football team return to practice Nov. 10 at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Mo. Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Commentary: Mizzou Football And The Power Of The Players

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Kansas City Chiefs outside linebacker Justin Houston (second from left) shakes hands with Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson after the NFL football game between the Lions and Chiefs at Wembley Stadium in London on Nov. 1. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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The NFL Is Kicking The Ball To The United Kingdom. Why?

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New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick signals from the sideline in the second half of an NFL game against the Miami Dolphins on Thursday in Foxborough, Mass. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Bill Belichick: Love Him, Hate Him, But Don't Deny He's An Original

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Devlin D'Zmura, a news manager at daily fantasy sports company DraftKings on Sept. 9. Customers of the two biggest daily fantasy sports websites — DraftKings and FanDuel — filed at least four lawsuits against the sites in October 2015. The customers accused the sites of cheating, and argued they wouldn't have played had they known employees with insider knowledge were playing on rival sites. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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States Should Get Into The Sports Gambling Game

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In this Sept. 15, 1930, photo, coach Knute Rockne puts his football proteges through the first football drill of the season at Cartier Field, South Bend, Ind. Rockne finished his career with an .860 winning percentage and delivered the famous "Win one for the Gipper" speech. AP hide caption

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Football, Notre Dame And Winning 'For The Gipper'

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The public share to pay for construction of a new Minnesota Vikings football stadium is reportedly $498 million. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Spending Public Money On Sports Stadiums Is Bad Business

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Actor Jake Gyllenhaal stars in Southpaw, a new movie about a junior middleweight boxing champion who faces adversity. Scott Garfield/The Weinstein Company hide caption

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Deford To Hollywood: Ban Boxing Movies

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Kelly Hirano, vice president of engineering, demonstrates the Yahoo Sports Daily Fantasy contest during a product launch in July in San Francisco. Yahoo has designed this experience for the mobile fantasy player and offers Daily Fantasy, Full Season Fantasy, and real-time sports news and scores as an all-in-one experience. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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For Love Or Money: Fans And Businesses Flock To Fantasy Sports

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Derek Jeter attends the launch party for his new website, The Players' Tribune, on Feb. 14 in New York City. The site is a platform for athletes to talk directly to fans. Timothy Hiatt/Getty Images hide caption

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Athletes Want To Talk To Fans Without Meddlesome Sports Journalists

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Decathlon gold medalist Bruce Jenner throws the javelin during an Olympic competition in Montreal on July 30, 1976. AP hide caption

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Bruce Jenner's Long History Of Clearing Hurdles

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Texas Rangers relief pitcher Lisalverto Bonilla throws during the fifth inning of a spring training baseball game against the Kansas City Royals on March 4, in Surprise, Ariz. He is scheduled to undergo Tommy John surgery this week. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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As American Sports Skew More Armcentric, Throwing Injuries Rise

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New York Red Bulls defender Chris Duvall (third from left) reacts toward the crowd after teammate Lloyd Sam scores during an MLS soccer game against D.C. United on March 22 in Harrison, N.J. The Red Bulls won 2-0. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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Deford: Americans Don't Care About Major League Soccer

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New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez watches from the dugout during an intrasquad game at a spring training baseball workout Monday in Tampa, Fla. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Alex Rodriguez Is Back, For Better Or Worse

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Kurt Busch drives during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race in Fort Worth, Texas, on Nov. 2, 2014. Busch was recently suspended indefinitely amid domestic violence accusations. Larry Papke/AP hide caption

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An Uneventful Week In Sports Could Still Go Down In History

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Sports commentator Mike "Doc" Emrick waves to fans as he is presented with a jersey by the New Jersey Devils in 2012. Bill Kostroun/AP hide caption

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Hockey's Doc Emrick And His 153 Verbs

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Members of the St. Louis Rams raise their arms to protest the grand jury decision in Ferguson, Mo., before a game last month. The players faced a backlash from St. Louis police and have been asked to apologize. L.G. Patterson/AP hide caption

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Deford: What's Wrong With Pro Athletes Taking A Stand?

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San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan celebrates with his teammates after defeating the Miami Heat in game five of the NBA finals in June. Ashley Landis/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Be Thankful This Year For The San Antonio Spurs

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Rulon Gardner took off his shoes to symbolize his retirement after defeating Sajad Barzi, of Iran, during the men's Greco-Roman 120kg wrestling bronze medal bout at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Goodbye To All That: Farewells In Sports

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Florida State fans cheer Rashad Greene after a 74-yard touchdown pass in the fourth quarter of an NCAA college football game against Clemson in Tallahassee, Fla., on Sept. 20. In college sports, African-American student athletes and white student audiences are the norm. Commentator Frank Deford asks why this dynamic does not make us more squeamish. Mark Wallheiser/AP hide caption

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Race And Sports

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